Attractions and Places to Visit in Belfast

Belfast, Northern Ireland’s capital, is a port city known as the birthplace of the RMS Titanic, and for its political murals, documenting the ‘Troubles’ of the 20th century. In the city’s renovated dockyards, the Titanic Quarter includes the

Titanic Belfast museum, an aluminium-clad edifice reminiscent of a ship’s hull, shipbuilder Harland and Wolff’s drawing offices and the Titanic slipways, which now host open-air concerts.

Here in Belfast, we have some of the coolest nightclubs, superb shopping and enough eateries to satisfy every taste and budget. There’s also no shortage of local and international artists and bands that stop by to perform at fantastic venues like Belfast Waterfront and the world class Odyssey Arena. You’ll also find fascinating walking, bus and taxi tours, cultural escapes, scientific exhibitions and literary inspirations. After all, this is the city that inspired the Chronicles of Narnia and Gulliver’s Travels.

Only in Belfast you can trace the Titanic story to its source, discover the passion and pride of those who designed and built her and relive the excitement of the Titanic era when the city was at the height of its powers.
Now you can relive the Titanic story as never before, at the world’s largest Titanic visitor experience, Titanic Belfast. 

Belfast is home to Titanic Studios where Game of Thrones is shot, and only a stone’s throw away from other filming locations across Northern Ireland including The King’s Road, Winterfell, The Wall and Dragonstone. Take a tour around Northern Ireland and discover the dramatic scenery used in the show.

Albert Clock. Cave Hill. Harland & Wolff. Stormont Castle. The Odyssey Arena. St. George’s Market. You may recognise some of these places but there’s a whole lot more waiting to be discovered. We’ve brought together some of the highlights and lesser-known treasures to help you get started. From the birthplace of the Titanic to our iconic city hall and everywhere in between, you’ll find a cornucopia of historic landmarks and fantastic attractions. Who knows what you’ll discover!

HMP Belfast, also known as Crumlin Road Gaol, is a former prison situated on the Crumlin Road in north Belfast, Northern Ireland. It is the only Victorian era prison remaining in Northern Ireland since 1996. It is affectionately known as the Crum. The Crumlin Road Gaol dates back to 1845 and closed its doors as a working prison in 1996. Explore over 150 years of history with a Guided Tour of Belfast's Infamous Prison.

Sir Thomas and Lady Dixon Park in South Belfast is probably the City's most popular park. It is home to the City of Belfast International Rose Garden, which attracts thousands of visitors to our Rose Week celebrations, which take place in July each year.

Covering more than 128 acres, the park is made up of rolling meadows, copses, woodland and gardens and is home to a wide range of plants and animals. An ideal base for exploring nearby Lagan Valley Regional Park, it contains international camellia trials, a walled garden, a Japanese-style garden with water features for quiet contemplation.

Sir Thomas and Lady Dixon Park was donated to the people of Belfast by Lady Dixon in 1959, in memory of her late husband, Sir Thomas.

Originally built alongside the mighty RMS Titanic in Belfast in 1911, the SS Nomadic is much more than just “Titanic’s little sister”. Designed by Thomas Andrews and built using the same design and similar luxurious finishes the similarities to the Titanic are plain to see. Being exactly one quarter of the size of her famous friend, the Nomadic is often referred to as “a mini Titanic” Over 100 years of history and adventures are evident the minute you step on board.

In April 1912, the Nomadic completed her most famous task by transferring the excited first and second-class passengers from the shallow dockside in Cherbourg out to the Titanic, which was moored in deeper water just off shore. In awe of the White Star Line luxury and ground breaking design those passengers were blissfully unaware of the tragic fate awaiting many of them only days later.

Botanic Gardens is a public park in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Occupying 28 acres of south Belfast, the gardens are popular with office workers, students and tourists. They are located on Stranmillis Road in Queen's Quarter, with Queen's University nearby.

The Ulster Museum is located at the main entrance to Botanic Gardens, has around 8,000 square metres of public display space, featuring material from the collections of fine art and applied art, archaeology, ethnography, treasures from the Spanish Armada, local history, numismatics, industrial archaeology, botany, zoology and geology. It is the largest museum in Northern Ireland, and one of the components of National Museums Northern Ireland.

Albert clock

Albert clock

The Albert Memorial in Queen's Square, Belfast was completed in 1870. Shortly after it was built, it began to lean towards the river and now has an 890mm tilt.
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Belfast Castle

Belfast Castle

The 9th Earl of Shaftesbury, presented Belfast Castle to the City of Belfast in 1934. In 1978, the Belfast City Council began a major refurbishment over a period of ten years at a cost of over two million pounds.  The building officially re-opened to the public on 11 November 1988. The castle boasts an antiques shop, a restaurant and visitors centre and it is a popular venue for conferences, private dining and wedding receptions.
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The Crown Bar Belfast

The Crown Bar- Belfast

The Crown Bar, also called The Crown Liquor Saloon is probably the most popular Bar for visitors to Belfast. It is a Victorian Gin Palace owned by the National Trust and managed by Mitchells & Butlers plc.
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